Tag Archives: settlement agreement

Common Divorce Questions You’ll Want to Ask Your Attorney

meeting with attorney

Common Divorce Questions to Ask Your Attorney | NOVAEstateLawyers.com

Marriages can sometimes end amicably, making divorce a relatively simple and clean process. However, many divorces can be painful, expensive, and complex.

Once you’ve agreed to divorce, you and your spouse will have to navigate the murky waters of settlement agreements, court documents, alimony/spousal support arrangements, and child custody/support, if you have minor children. To ensure you’re following the proper legal procedures – and that you have a positive and mutually beneficial outcome – you should seek the services of a qualified divorce attorney.

You can start this process by setting up an appointment with an experienced divorce lawyer in your local area. Your attorney will act as your guide and advocate, and the initial consultation is the best time for you to clear up any uncertainties or concerns you might have. Here are some common divorce questions you’ll want to ask when you meet with your attorney.

1. Are we eligible to file for divorce right now?

According to Virginia’s divorce laws, couples filing for a no-fault divorce must have been separated for 12 full months if they have minor children, or six full months, with no minor children and a signed settlement agreement. However, the rules and timelines are different if you are filing for an at-fault divorce on grounds such as adultery, cruelty, or desertion. Your attorney will be able to tell you how soon you can file for divorce.

2. Who will get custody of our children?

For couples with minor children, determining custody arrangements can be one of the messiest parts about divorce. If you and your spouse can’t reach an agreement on your own, a judge will have the task of deciding what’s in the best interest of your minor child(ren). Many factors are considered here, so you’ll want to ask your divorce attorney what your options are regarding custody, and what a judge will take into account. Your attorney can help you understand the most likely outcome given your unique situation, and can guide you in choosing which battles to fight and which to concede.

3. Do I have to pay (or will I receive) alimony/spousal support?

The amount of spousal support you may request (or will have to pay) is highly dependent on your individual circumstances. Your custody arrangements (if minor children are involved) and who earns the majority of income in your household can have an effect on your outcome. Ask your divorce attorney early on what you should expect to pay or receive, so you can plan your finances accordingly.

4. How do we split our assets?

If you and your spouse did not sign a prenuptial agreement, you may not know how to fairly split your assets in your impending divorce. Dividing marital property can be complicated, and if you and your spouse can’t reach an amicable, mutually beneficial agreement, you may need to bring this question before a judge. If there is a dispute over who should receive which assets, your attorney can help you better understand your chances of a favorable ruling.

5. What should I expect during my divorce hearing?

If you haven’t been through a divorce before, the idea of appearing before a judge to sort out your issues could be intimidating. Ask your divorce attorney what to expect in the preparation of a hearing, including what information you should have ready to present. Although no two cases are alike, your divorce lawyer should be able to provide you some idea of what will occur.

6. Do we really have to go to court?

A no-fault divorce can result in an amicable split without any divorce hearings in court. The first step in this process is drafting a marital settlement agreement. This document requires you and your spouse to decide how you will divide property, who gets primary custody, and the amount of spousal or child support to be paid, if any is needed. An experienced divorce attorney can help you craft this document and review it to ensure it’s fair for both parties.

Contact the Law Office of Patricia E. Tichenor for help with your divorce.

Whether you’re just beginning the separation process or you’re ready to file for divorce, the Law Office of Patricia E. Tichenor can help. We’ve spent nearly two decades helping Virginia residents with settlement agreements, divorce cases, and other family law matters. Contact us to discuss your situation and begin the divorce process.

Tips for Drafting Your Settlement Agreement

couples' hands with divorce settlement agreement between them

Divorce Settlement Agreement Tips | NOVAEstateLawyers.com

If you and your spouse have agreed to file for a no-fault divorce, you may be wondering where to begin, from a legal standpoint.

In the Commonwealth of Virginia, filing for this type of divorce requires you to be legally separated from your spouse for a minimum of one full year. However, if you have no minor children, you may file for divorce after six full months of separation, provided that you and your spouse have signed a valid settlement agreement.

What is a divorce settlement agreement?

A divorce settlement agreement, also known as a separation agreement, a marital settlement agreement, a separation and property settlement agreement, or a custody, support, and property agreement, is a legal document defining how you and your spouse plan to divide your assets and debts. It also outlines any specific terms you and your spouse mutually agree to abide by during and after your divorce, including spousal support (if applicable) and any custody, support, and visitation matters (if you have minor children together).

One key advantage to a settlement agreement is that you and your spouse can divorce on your own terms, without bringing any nasty details into the courtroom. In a no-fault, uncontested divorce case, a judge can simply review your agreement and incorporate its terms into your final order of divorce. It may also help speed along the already-lengthy divorce process by eliminating the need for multiple court appearances.

How to draft your settlement agreement

Even for the most amicable divorcing couples, it can be difficult and painful to draft your settlement agreement, as it forces you to confront the end of your marriage. Below, we provide a few tips to help you make the process smoother and easier.

1. Start your discussion about the agreement from a calm emotional place, in a neutral location.

If you and your spouse try to discuss the terms of your settlement agreement when you are emotionally charged, or if you’re in a place that feels uncomfortable (such as your former marital home), you may find it difficult to make much progress. Schedule a time and location with your soon-to-be ex – just like any other professional meeting – so you can both mentally prepare for the discussion ahead.

2. Get a good picture of your individual and joint assets.

Every bank account, credit card, loan, mortgage, lease payment, retirement account, property, vehicle, and valuable asset you own will need to be listed in your settlement agreement. Preparing a thorough list of these accounts and assets, including any that you own separately from your spouse, will make it easier to go through them and decide what to do with them moving forward.

3. Agree on your date of separation.

The date of separation listed in your agreement determines when you and your spouse can officially file for divorce. Your date of separation does not necessarily have to be the date you or your spouse moved out of your marital home – it can simply be the date you had a conversation in which you agreed to seek a divorce. However, if you are still under the same roof, be sure to specifically state in your agreement that you are living “separate and apart” (i.e., separate rooms and engaging in behaviors that suggest you are a couple).

4. Know what you want, but be prepared to compromise.

Drafting a settlement agreement is a negotiation. You do not have to sign any agreement that you feel is unfair, and you have a right to ask your spouse to consider different terms. However, understand that you will likely not get everything you want – and neither will your spouse. It’s important to know going into this discussion what you are willing to compromise on, and where you want to stand firm.

5. Consult an experienced attorney.

While it is possible to draft a settlement agreement without legal help, an experienced attorney understands the ins and outs of your home state’s laws regarding separation and divorce. Without consulting a family law professional, the language in your settlement agreement may inadvertently put you at a disadvantage when you begin your divorce proceedings.

To play it safe, we highly recommend hiring an attorney to help you draft your agreement. At a minimum, you should ask a legal professional review the one you and your spouse drafted before you notarize it.

The Law Office of Patricia E. Tichenor has nearly two decades of experience helping Virginia residents with their family law matters, including settlement agreements and divorce cases. Contact us to discuss your circumstances so we can help you take this important step in your separation.

The Law Office of Patricia E. Tichenor, P.L.L.C.
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(703) 669-6700

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